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Hout Bay – a Delightful Hideaway
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Hout Bay – a Delightful Hideaway

Hout Bay gained its name from early Dutch settlers in the Cape. It literally means Wood Bay, for the timber they gathered there to construct the early buildings in the Cape. After a brief period where the area was used for Manganese mining, the still-existent fishing industry was founded. One of the main attractions in Hout Bay to this day, aside from the white sandy beaches and mountains that encircled the protected bay, is the harbour. Home to several art and curio stores, restaurants and maritime antiquity dealers, the harbour is a must visit. Take a stroll along the piers, buy fresh...
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Oxpecker Research Facility unveiled at Mokopane
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Oxpecker Research Facility unveiled at Mokopane

Oxpecker Research Facility unveiled at Mokopane: The National Zoological Gardens of South Africa’s Mokopane Centre unveiled its custom-designed oxpecker facility on Friday 18th July 2008. This facility is for the research of Red-billed Oxpeckers with the aim of breeding and relocating these endangered birds to areas throughout South Africa. In the 1900’s oxpecker numbers were drastically reduced as a result of the use of dips to treat livestock against tick infestations. As a result, many oxpeckers, whose main source of food is ticks, were killed by the poison. Since that time, awareness ha...
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Wacky & Wonderful Robertson!
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Wacky & Wonderful Robertson!

Located in the foothills of the Langeberg Mountains, on Route 62 between Worcester and Swellendam, is the small town of Robertson. With a history spanning more than 150 years, having been founded in 1853, the town has plenty to offer, despite only having a population in the region of 17 000 people. Many of the original Victorian houses still line the streets, along with the Jacarandas that have earned the town the nickname of “Jacaranda capital of the Western Cape.” The Robertson valley is also one of the key wine producers in the Western Cape, and the valley boasts no fewer than 31 ...
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The Transkei
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The Transkei

When driving towards the Transkei, particularly between East London and the Kei River crossing, it almost seems as if you are entering another country. This, you can tell, is wild, untamed country. Whereas en route to Transkei you will travel through towns and cities much like any other in South Africa, when you get there these bastions of civilization are few and far between, with miles and miles of lush, unspoilt green fields and countless aloes lining the hills and valleys of this beautiful area instead. Having been an independent homeland, the traditional Xhosa stronghold for many y...
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Exploring the Cederberg
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Exploring the Cederberg

Many people remember being a teenager with a fond, misty, sentimental look on their face. I for one am lucky to crack a grimace at some of the downright outrageous things I got up to during those years. Like the time my friends and I decided to go camping in the Cederberg. At the end of high-school, instead of heading to Plettenberg Bay, the age-old venue for school-leaving parties, we thought beat the commercial crowds and head straight to the heart of the wilderness to live rough, drink hard and come back laughing at the herds who had frittered away their first taste of post-school freedo...
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Diving in Cape Town
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Diving in Cape Town

Silently balancing in a state of almost complete weightlessness, the dark water moving around you, it can feel almost meditative. Here, in the quiet depths of the ocean, you are forced to ignore your often hyperactive, chattering mind and just focus on the dive, all your attention focused on absorbing the strange and sometimes alien world around you. As regular divers know, nothing compares to the raw purity of the untamed sea. The great thing about diving in Cape Town is the variety of dives. For starters you have two oceans to choose from and on any given day if the conditions are...
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Blackheath Lodge in Sea Point
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Blackheath Lodge in Sea Point

Blackheath Lodge is, quite simply, an indulgence. Set snug up against Signal Hill in Sea Point, Cape Town, this Victorian style, spacious home has been converted into a guest house deluxe with first rate service and that something ‘extra’ that comes from its gracious and downright affable host, Antony. Blackheath Lodge is a gorgeous Victorian renovation. Its wooden floors, high ceilings, spacious interiors and unobtrusive décor, with just a smattering of African chic, gives it an elegance that provides a charming welcome to weary travellers. Every large en-suite room, of which there ...
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Exploring the Cango Caves
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Exploring the Cango Caves

The KhoiSan used the Cango Caves thousands of years ago as shelter but nobody else realized the beauty under the limestone ledge until the curiosity of a farmer in 1780 made him lower himself into the caves to investigate. For the first time his dim torch showed an awesome splendour that still takes the breath away today as countless people make the pilgrimage to the caves each year. The Cango Caves can be found about 26 kilometres north of the town of Oudtshoorn, which lies in the heart of the Little Karoo. In the last century the caves have become world renowned not only with South Af...
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Hermanus Whale-Crier
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Hermanus Whale-Crier

Until fairly recently it was unknown to all but locals, but mention the small South Africa coastal town of Hermanus anywhere in the world today and someone will have heard about the village, and no doubt, the whales. Whales are one of the most popular and well known attractions on offer in this small town, located nearby Cape Town on the eastern coast of the Cape and have been instrumental in transforming a now booming tourist industry. One of the most unique aspects of the Hermanus whale experience is the whale crier, the town’s own “GPS” for the Southern Right whales that frequent its c...
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Hot Springs in the Western Cape
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Hot Springs in the Western Cape

Hot springs have long been known to have beneficial effects on health, as well as a relaxing, rejuvenating way to while away time. High in natural minerals due to geothermal activities deep below the ground, which causes the water that bubbles up through the earth to be heated, their waters are thought to provide physical benefits to the skin. Whatever the scientific reason, there is no doubt that the warm, cocooning sensation of the water has a definite impact on one's overall feeling of wellbeing! The Western Cape area is fortuitously dotted with these springs and in many cases resort...
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Hiking the Otter Trail
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Hiking the Otter Trail

When they say you have to be ‘reasonably fit’ to be able to do the Otter Trail it means you better be able to carry all your equipment across rugged terrain for five days. However, as any serious hiker will confirm, the Otter Trail is simply the most glorious hiking trail in South Africa. The Otter Trail is for people who really want to hike and enjoy the extraordinary landscape as they go along, who want to immerse themselves in beauty and do not mind getting sweaty and having aching muscles at the end of each day. In other words if you spend more time thinking about what outfit to wear to...
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Hermanus – The Riviera of the South
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Hermanus – The Riviera of the South

My first memories of Hermanus are from high school holidays, my school friends and I taking the bus up the East coast for a week of getting ejected unceremoniously from bars for being underage, scorned by the local girls for not being cool enough and raiding the liquor cabinets of parents that were gullible and unfortunate to allow us to stay in their Hermanus holiday homes. At around 115kms South East of Cape Town, or around an hours drive from the city centre, Hermanus, also known as the Riviera of the South, can be found. Once a sleepy little fishing village, this bustling town is now a...
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Public Transport in Cape Town
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Public Transport in Cape Town

Every day, thousands of Capetonian commuters use public transport to get where they need to be. Squeezing into minibus taxis and train carriages, it’s a long haul to and from work for many of the Mother City’s citizens. Public transport offers a cost-effective way of travelling in our fair city and also allows one to immerse oneself in its day-to-day culture. The bedrock of transport on Cape Town's roads is the minibus taxi. From dawn until well past midnight, these rugged little 12- to 15-seaters shuttle back and forth along the city's main roads and highways. Although the driver often ta...
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Delightful Darling
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Delightful Darling

Known to some as the perfect weekend getaway and to others as an artistic refuge, 75 kilometres from the heart of Cape Town lies the sleepy town of Darling. As Cape Town has expanded, more and more city folk have chosen to leave behind suburban living and build a new life in one of the Western Cape's outlying villages.  Darling was one of the first such towns and remains one of the favourites for its thriving local community and attractive natural surrounds. In less than an hour's drive you can remove yourself from all the cosmopolitan bustle of the city to a tranquillity and old-world...
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Adventure Sports in Cape Town
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Adventure Sports in Cape Town

Crouching behind a rock with a stinging wound on my back that was almost certainly going to bruise, I was having the most fun I’d had in a long time. I stood up and fired two rounds of high-velocity paintballs at the approaching weekend warriors. Shouts of pain and frustration told me that my projectiles had found their mark. Yes, despite Cape Town’s amazing range of wines and plethora of drinking spots, adrenalin is in fact the favoured intoxicant for many city-dwellers. The plentiful supply of rugged terrain and occasionally even more rugged locals means that Cape Town is one of t...
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