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Posted on: Friday, 7 February 2014

10 Secret Beaches in South Africa

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South Africa has numerous popular beaches. From the West Coast just south of Namibia all the way around to Kosi Bay just south of Mozambique, there are more beaches than one can count. But there are few that remain untamed, out of the ordinary and barely frequented (unless you are prepared to consistently head to the Wild Coast for your swim).

For the most part, you are more likely to be directed to the country’s more popular beaches (Camps Bay, Clifton, Ballito, Umhlanga, Cape Vidal etc.) than to those known by few.

Here is a list of the beaches in South Africa you might not know about. They’re not your highly popular swimming and surfing beaches (although a couple have blue flag status), but each has a uniqueness and beauty that make them well worth seeking out …

 

Elands Bay
The beach at Elands Bay, Cape West Coast

 

Elands Bay, Cape West Coast

Something of a surprise to all who head here, the endless beach (it is really long) is particularly beautiful, and the coastal town undeveloped. Three hours’ drive from Cape Town, Elands Bay’s coastal wilderness functions as a palliate for the soul. Watch the gulls throwing mussels onto the rocks in a bid to open them. Left Point is a worldclass surfing beach.

Smitswinkel Bay, Cape Town

Out of the ordinary, and found by few, Smitswinkel Bay lies right down at the base of a cliff on the bend before Cape Point Nature Reserve. You will need to tramp down the pathway that is more accessible than it looks, but take little with you, or the return will be tough. But the bay is beautiful. Not a great swimming beach, but perfect for getaway beach time. Consider the residents who enjoy their privacy.

 

Rooi Els
Rooi Els, Cape Overberg

 

Rooi Els, Overberg

On the very tip of the Kogelberg Biosphere you will find Rooi Els, a relatively unknown seaside village and one of four little towns on this stretch of Route 44. The beach’s unique layout not only includes safe seaside swimming, and access to shellfish diving and fishing, but it also flanks a lagoon in which you can often spot the Cape clawless otter. Hangklip looms in the background.

Grotto Beach, Hermanus

Despite being a blue flag beach with an incredible stretch of sandy beach, all 18 km of it, and mountains in the background, Grotto Beach is not all that well known probably because it is outside of Hermanus and you need to know the little road that takes you there. Great for swimming, bodyboarding and children (there is a park), although you might want to avoid it in season.

 

Noetzie Beach
Noetzie Beach near Knysna, Garden Route

 

Noetzie, Knysna

Known as the beach of the castles (because there really are a number of castles), Noetzie lies ten minutes east of Knysna in a rather secluded cove with a beautiful beach, part of the Noetzie Conservancy. The secluded spot has quite a history as a holiday retreat, and horse-drawn carts originally brought farmers here from Knysna and Oudtshoorn to holiday.

Gonubie, East London

A little more popular than is strictly necessary to classify this beach as ‘secret’, Gonubie lies roughly 20 km north east of East London on the Gonubie River. A beach with tidal pools, and a wooden walkway and lagoon, children can spend hours discovering shells and other little sea creatures here. And the village behind the beach is seriously laidback. A wonderful place to chill.

 

 Shelley Bay at Kenton On Sea
Tidal Pool Shelley Bay at Kenton On Sea

 

Shelley Bay, Kenton-on-Sea

The highlight of this beach is the high rock on either side of the sandy strip that seems to slope in towards you, sheltering the bay in a way that makes you feel cut off from the world. It is small enough that it is sometimes referred to as a tidal pool, whilst its relative anonymity makes it a hideout for those intent on escape. From here you can traipse over the sand dunes and through a milkwood forest in the Joan Muirhead Nature Reserve for even more romance.

Hluleka, Wild Coast

A secluded and virtually flawless cove set on the edge of the Hluleka Nature Reserve on the Wild Coast, this beach lies bounded by coastal forest from which you can hear the caslls of birds and monkeys. Perfect for walks and picnics, shell collecting, fishing and spotting dolphins and whales from the rocky shore, Hluleka is the kind of beach you will find it difficult to leave.

 

Sodwana Bay, Elephant CoastSodwana Bay, Elephant Coast

 

Umzumbe, south coast KwaZulu-Natal

Often called Pumula beach because it lies rather close to a hotel of the same name, Umzumbe is a blue flag beach, fringed by a dune forest with safe swimming and a tidal pool. A relative newcomer to blue flag status you will need to walk down a rather steep walkway to reach it, but by all accounts it is well worth the effort.

Sodwana Bay beach, iSimangaliso Wetland park

Sodwana has long been known as the diver’s choice location with three reefs to explore. Night dives easily make it on to the ‘must-do’ list, whilst in summer leatherback and loggerhead turtles use the beach to lay their eggs, which draws eco-tourists. But over and above these attractions are the kilometres of unspoilt beach fringed by forest.

Explore our Beaches:

Western Cape Beaches
Eastern Cape Beaches
Garden Route Beaches
KwaZulu Natal Beaches
Waters Edge Beach

 

Wanda Coustas

About 

Wanda Coustas has written in one form or another for 10 years, seven of them as a copyblogger. She has travelled the Western Cape extensively and the rest of the country in protracted road trips that have given her both joy and an ongoing relish for experiencing what she writes about first-hand. She is a trained opera singer, poet, eurythmy dancer, philosopher, and bee whisperer.

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1 comment about 10 Secret Beaches in South Africa
  1. February 27th, 2014 at 11:08
    Hamish Turner says:

    Hello
    Thanks for the info on SA beaches.
    I used to fish along the S Coast – but it is not safe to do so these days.
    I disnt realise Stoms River was a marine park – booked in for 5 days last year – and then only discovered it was a marine park!!

    Can you provide some pointers – say in the W Cape where one can fish without worrying about being robbed.

    Thanks
    Hamish